The Five Buddha Families, by Francesca Fremantle

13 12 2016

“all of our negative emotions can be transmuted into wisdom.”

Buddhism now

The_Dhyani_Buddha_Akshobhya',_Tibetan_thangka,_late_13th_century,_Honolulu_Academy_of_Arts wikipedia.orgIt is possible to look at our whole life—our experience and our mind—as a mandala. The mandala is a ground of possible transformation, and the mandala of samsara—the confused, chaotic, basic ground—is also the mandala of nirvana. Tantra says that samsara and nirvana are one, that there is no difference—the very same energy which is distorted, confused and cloudy, and which generates the samsaric world, can be the pure, vibrant colours of the enlightened Buddha wisdom.

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You Are Not A Permanent Person, by Ajahn Sumedho

12 12 2016

timeless teachings, so relevant today…

Buddhism now

Sheep on roadside Dartmoor, DevonThe Five Aggregates

One way of dividing up the conditioned realm is into five aggregates (khandhas)—

  1. body (rupa),
  2. feeling (vedana),
  3. perception (sanna),
  4. mental formations (sankhara) and
  5. consciousness (vinnana).

When I first started meditating many years ago, I could understand the definitions of the five aggregates, but I did not know their reality; I had never really contemplated these things in an intuitive way through observing my own body, feelings, perceptions, mental formations, or consciousness. Initially, I really only contemplated the physical body, the four elements (earth, fire water and air), the parts of the body (eyes, ears, nose, tongue, etc) and the body itself. I contemplated material things, anything formed.

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